Autor Tópico: Classificação da OMS  (Lida 3534 vezes)

Offline Boiler

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Classificação da OMS
« em: Dezembro 12, 2009, 14:28:25 »
Boa tarde,

Não sei se a escolha do tópico tenha sido a melhor, mas pareceu-me a mais acertada, posto isto...
Ando a realizar um artigo científico acerca da representação da enfermagem na sociedade portuguesa, mas para tal necessitava de fazer uma divisão da amostra por idades para colocar no SPSS, mas para tal necessito da classificação das idades da OMS.
Andei no sítio da OMS e não visualizei nada nesse sentido.
Se alguém me puder facultar essa informação agradecia.

Cumprimentos
"What is the most resilient parasite? A bacteria? A virus? An intestinal worm? ...An idea. Resilient, highly contagious. Once an idea has taken hold of the brain it's almost impossible to irradicate. An idea that is fully formed, fully understood. That sticks, right in there somewhere."

Offline Boiler

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Re: Classificação da OMS
« Responder #1 em: Dezembro 13, 2009, 23:57:15 »
217 visualizações e não há uma alma caridosa que me ajude... :s
"What is the most resilient parasite? A bacteria? A virus? An intestinal worm? ...An idea. Resilient, highly contagious. Once an idea has taken hold of the brain it's almost impossible to irradicate. An idea that is fully formed, fully understood. That sticks, right in there somewhere."

Offline Raquel..ade

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Re: Classificação da OMS
« Responder #2 em: Dezembro 14, 2009, 00:49:09 »
ola colega na OMS nao sei se encontra mas sei que Fontaine(2000) distingue pelo menos as subclasses em idosos...talvez encontre alguma coisa sobre outra idades....aqui vai um excerto da minha monografia....


"de acordo com Fontaine (2000) o idoso quanto à sua idade cronológica pode ser caracterizado como idoso jovem se tiver de 65 a 74 anos, idoso de 75 a 84 anos e muito idoso se tiver 85 anos ou mais".

Offline Boiler

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Re: Classificação da OMS
« Responder #3 em: Dezembro 14, 2009, 09:37:10 »
obrigado colega, já dá uma ajuda, se bem que o questionário foi realizado a maiores de 18 anos, portanto fica ainda uma grande lacuna até aos 65 anos.

cumprimentos
"What is the most resilient parasite? A bacteria? A virus? An intestinal worm? ...An idea. Resilient, highly contagious. Once an idea has taken hold of the brain it's almost impossible to irradicate. An idea that is fully formed, fully understood. That sticks, right in there somewhere."

Offline charlie_ze

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Re: Classificação da OMS
« Responder #4 em: Dezembro 15, 2009, 10:57:48 »
Procurei e nada enconterei nada da OMS, mas

http://webusability.com/article_age_cla ... 8_2002.htm

Age Classifications:
When Considering the Age of Users, How Old is "Old"?

by Dr. Bob Bailey

August, 2002



When considering the age of users – how old is "old"?

Martina Ziefle from the Department of Psychology at the Technical University in Aachen, Germany compared user performance on two different display technologies: CRT screens and TFT screens. CRT's are used on most desktops, and flat-panel TFT screens are used on most laptops. She divided her 24 participants, who were frequent computer users, into the following age groups:

        Older51-65
        Middle-aged 40-50
        Young 20-30

Her users searched several lines of alphabetic characters looking for specific target characters. She recorded the time to find the targets, their accuracy and whether they preferred the CRT or TFT screens.

Ziefle found that the search times were reliably (22%) shorter when viewing the TFT screens for all age groups, and that 18 of the 24 participants preferred the TFT screen. There was no reliable difference in accuracy. When compared with the other two age groups (young and middle-aged), older users benefited most from using the TFT screens.

Her findings are fascinating, even though her "older" group was relatively young when compared with the findings from many other studies. Herein lies the age problem. When do older users begin to demonstrate age-related deficiencies in performance?

Unfortunately, researchers use a variety of different age categories in their research. To help illustrate the many different definitions of "old" in research studies, consider one recent study by Charness and Dijkstra (1999). These researchers actually conducted three different studies that compared the performance of younger and older adults. In their first study, the older users were defined as those "over 58;" in their second study, the older users were "over age 40;" and in their third study, the older users were "over 50."

Timothy Nichols, Wendy Rogers, Arthur Fisk and Lacy West at the Georgia Institute of Technology attempted to see which adult age classifications were most commonly reported. They reviewed the age classifications reported over the past few years in the Human Factors Journal and the journal, Psychology & Aging.

After combining the information for many studies, the researchers in these journals classified the adults into the following age groupings:

        Older58-82
        Middle-aged 40-59
        Young 19-35

Note that some that were classified as older in some studies were classified as middle-aged in others. And some ages were left our entirely. If we take their classification and fill in the gaps, and add an "old-old" category (now being used more in the industry), we have the following:

        Old-old75 and older
        Older60-74
        Middle-aged 40-59
        Young 18-39

I like the above classification, even though I am not sure whether there are any interesting (and measurable) human performance differences occurring between the "young" and "middle-aged" groups. Even so, we definitely need to standardize the age classifications for researchers, particularly for identifying "older" users, so that designers can understand whether or not study findings apply to their older users.

References

Charness, N. and Dijkstra, K. (1999), Age, luminance, and print legibility in homes, offices, and public places, Human Factors, 41(2), 173-193.

Nichols, T.A., Rogers, W.A., Fisk, A.D. and West, L. D. (2001), How old are your participants? An investigation of age classifications as reported in human factors, Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 45th Annual Meeting, 260-261.

Ziefle, M. (2001), Aging, visual performance and eyestrain in different screen technologies, Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 45th Annual Meeting, 262-266.

Offline Boiler

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Re: Classificação da OMS
« Responder #5 em: Dezembro 15, 2009, 12:49:47 »
obrigado charlie_ze

cumprimentos
"What is the most resilient parasite? A bacteria? A virus? An intestinal worm? ...An idea. Resilient, highly contagious. Once an idea has taken hold of the brain it's almost impossible to irradicate. An idea that is fully formed, fully understood. That sticks, right in there somewhere."

Offline Herodes

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Re: Classificação da OMS
« Responder #6 em: Dezembro 27, 2009, 08:11:16 »
Idades inferiores a 15 anos talvez tenham grande dificuldade ou desconhecimento sobre aquilo que fazem os enfermeiros.

Offline MUSADOORIENTE

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Re: Classificação da OMS
« Responder #7 em: Dezembro 27, 2009, 10:19:06 »
Essa seria uma das conclusões interessantes que o estudo nos mostraria.